Note to self…

Keep a closer eye on anti-virus software to make sure it’s actually doing something. After last weekend’s trauma of clearing viruses from my laptop, I discovered this weekend that this site had been over-run, causing Google to shun me, and consequently Twitter to do likewise.

The site’s clean again, and has been accepted back into the Google fold, but Twitter still hates me and is ignoring my plaintive cries for help. (These will presently turn to mutters of pure geek rage, liable to be ignored even more emphatically)

Aside: Was Moby Dick the original fail whale?

Also: Eeep. Just changed the link structure without checking which posts have links to other posts within my site…

Joheunnom nabbeunnom isanghannom

See, now, that’s my kind of movie. I want to do that.

I’ll admit to a certain confusion over parts of The Good, The Bad, The Weird‘s plot, character motivation, location (Oh, Manchuria, not Mongolia, right – that explains a lot – possibly…*), not helped by my inability to distinguish Korean from Japanese when they’re both subtitled. But, unlike most Hollywood films with nonsensical plotting, The Good, The Bad, The Weird has the kind of cinematic energy and sheer bravura that renders that point moot.

The Good, The Bad, The Weird: Jung Woo-sung as The Good - oddly reminiscent of Lou Diamond Phillips, which had me flashing to Young Guns...

I’ve developed quite a taste for Korean film – it always seems much fresher than Hollywood offerings. The Good, The Bad, The Weird plays fast and loose with the western genre in a way that few Western directors would attempt**. Takashi Miike does a similar thing with Sukiyaki Western Django: that film hasn’t been released in the UK, but from the trailer it appears to have a far more arch tone (and features Quentin Tarantino, acting – we all know how well that turns out…). The Good, The Bad, The Weird manages to balance the absurdity of its over-the-top action with humour and without becoming too convinced of its own cleverness.

The Good, The Bad, The Weird does occasionally get bogged down in action sequences that run too long, but it’s never less than entertaining – it’s a grin-inducing film for a geek like me.

*My knowledge of Manchuria pretty much begins and ends with Laurence Harvey’s head coming to a point

**It’s like Firefly in 1930’s Manchuria.

Fangirl for WordPress

Updating the site to WordPress 2.7 from 2.5, now that my broadband is back. (Is that worrying, that the first thing I think of isn’t communicating with the outside world, but tweaking my blog system?) It’s codenamed ‘Coltrane’ (They have a jazz naming thing going on. I don’t object, because I am a WP fangirl, but it’s overly optimistic about the nature of blogging :)

It’s all different (go to the WordPress site for an elaboration, I’m not much above – ooh, AJAX-y!), and will now apparently be updatable without me backing everything up and then carefully installing the new version, which is useful, but I still get a certain satisfaction from doing this and it actually working, rather than giving me pert error messages.

So now the image upload thing should work (eee!) (I should probably elaborate: It’s not that the image upload hasn’t worked since WP 2.5, it’s just that I kept forgetting to upgrade this site until now, so missed the various bug-fixes. Upgrading means I realise how long it is since I posted anthing), which means I can see whether the AJAX-y image thing on the front page works now…

The Kelpie of the Canal

There are no fish in the canal.
Water lilies tangle the lines they cast to catch the fish that are not there.
He sees her walking (the dog barks at him).
He helps her pull the dog from the water lilies. The dog snaps at him, and she smiles.
She walks every day, and he smiles as she passes (thinks of water lilies).
The anglers curse their broken lines
He gives her water lilies (binds them in her hair).
They dredge the canal.
The girls are tangled together (water lilies in their hair).
There are fish in the canal.